Keynotes and Panelists

All events on this page take place at the Fleck Dance Theatre,
3rd Floor, 207 Queen's Quay West (map)

Friday October 31

9:00 – 10:30 am: Keynote Lecture

Dr. Michael Neiberg,
Professor of History, United States Army War College

Dr. Michael Neiberg, Professor of History, United States Army War CollegeMichael S. Neiberg was born and raised in Pittsburgh.  Educated at the University of Michigan (BA) and Carnegie Mellon University (MA and PhD), he has taught at the United States Air Force Academy and the University of Southern Mississippi.  He is now Professor of History at the United States Army War College in the Department of National Security and Strategy.

Dr. Neiberg has academic backgrounds in social history, military history, French history, and American history.  He has published widely on the theme of war in the world, especially in the era of the two world wars.  His most recent books are Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of War in 1914 (Harvard University Press, 2011) and The Blood of Free Men: The Liberation of Paris, 1944 (Basic Books, 2012).  In 2015 Basic Books will publish his most recent book TERMINAL: The Potsdam Conference and the End of the Age of Total War in Europe, 1914-1945.  He lives with his wife, two daughters, and assorted pets in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

Topic of Lecture:

For the last century, historians have focused most of their attention on a small number of decision-making elites in the fateful year of 1914. This project, however, looks at the reactions of people far form the centers of power. It shows that they did not blindly follow their leaders or desire war as a way to avenge ancient slights to national honor. The ways that they did respond to the outbreak of the war gives us new insights into what happened in 1914 and what it means a century later. 

Saturday November 1

9:00 – 10:30 am: Keynote Event

Dr. David Stevenson, London School of Economics
On-stage interview conducted by CBC’s Michael Enright

Dr. David Stevenson, London School of EconomicsDr. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at the London School of Economics & Political Science. He holds the chair endowed by Sir Daniel Stevenson in 1926. His publications include French War Aims against Germany, 1914-1919 (Oxford, 1982); The First World War and International Politics (Oxford, 1998); Armaments and the Coming of War: Europe, 1904-1914 (Oxford, 1996); 1914-1918: the History of the First World War (Penguin, 2004); and With Our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918 (Penguin, 2011). He is currently writing an international history of the year 1917.

Topic of Interview:

Professor Stevenson will be addressing the origins of the war and the 1914 crisis. He will be referring back to his work on the arms race before 1914, commenting on the link between arms competition and the origins of the war, and making comparisons with other arms races. This will link into a wider discussion about strategy, including the Schlieffen-Moltke Plan, and whether war planning helped to undermine the European peace. Stevenson is currently editing and contributing to a book on arms races from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, and will be making comparisons with 1939 and the Cold War, not to mention the current situation.

In the second part of the discussion Stevenson will address “war aims” and what the war was about. His first book was on French war aims; more recently he has done research on the war aims of the Central Powers and written about the war as a contest between rival projects for European integration. This will allow the discussion to revisit the 'Fischer thesis' and would connect to the debate in Britain, where attitudes towards British involvement in the war have become tied in with controversies about the UK's position in Europe. 

Interviewer:
Michael Enright
Veteran Broadcaster

Michael Enright, Veteran BroadcasterMichael Enright, host of CBC Radio One's The Sunday Edition, is known for his superb interviewing skills and exceptional investigative reporting that breaks through the boundaries of standard news broadcasting. Enright delivers engaging talks on what is going on in Canada and around the world, tying in personal anecdotes from his wide ranging career, and also speaks with authority on issues surrounding the media, including media literacy and the future of journalism.

Prior to joining The Sunday Edition, he hosted This Morning for three years, and he spent ten years hosting CBC Radio's As It Happens. In 1974, Enright hosted CBC Radio's This Country in the Morning. He has also been the temporary host of Sunday Morning, Cross Country Checkup and Montreal's morning radio show, Daybreak.

He has written for Time magazine and was the editor of Quest. As assistant managing editor of Maclean's, he oversaw the magazine's shift from a monthly to a weekly publication. Enright worked for The Toronto Star as a political writer and was Washington correspondent for The Globe and Mail. He received a Southam Fellowship for Journalism in 1979 to study Chinese history.

Enright was one of the three judges for the Scotiabank Giller Literary Prize for 2010 and was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2012.

Sunday November 2

10:00am -12:00 noon: Keynote Event

Panel of International WWI Scholars

Dr. David Stevenson, London School of Economics, UK
Dr. Annika Mombauer, The Open University, UK
Dr. Nicolas Offenstadt, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France

Moderator: Dr. Ian McKay, Queen’s University

Topic of Panel Discussion:

This will be a national/transnational discussion about the cultural memory of WWI and the ways in which the recollection of the war has changed over the past 100 years.  It will also include a look at how contemporary governments in Europe have (or haven’t) memorialized the war at the centenary.  Our panelists, each of whom is an expert within different national historical frameworks, will bring British, French and German national perspectives to this discussion.

David Stevenson:

Dr. David Stevenson, London School of EconomicsDr. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at the London School of Economics & Political Science. He holds the chair endowed by Sir Daniel Stevenson in 1926. His publications include French War Aims against Germany, 1914-1919 (Oxford, 1982); The First World War and International Politics (Oxford, 1998); Armaments and the Coming of War: Europe, 1904-1914 (Oxford, 1996); 1914-1918: The History of the First World War (Penguin, 2004); and With Our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918 (Penguin, 2011). He is currently writing an international history of the year 1917.

Annika Mombauer

Dr. Annika MombauerDr. Mombauer is a Senior Lecturer in Modern European History at The Open University, UK. She studied history at the Westfälische-Wilhelms-Universität in Münster, Germany, and at the University of Sussex, UK, where she was awarded a D.Phil in History in 1998. From 2006 until 2011 she was the Secretary of the German History Society. She is a member of the Editorial Board of 1914-1918 Online (Encyclopedia of the First World War).

Annika Mombauer’s research interests are in nineteenth and twentieth-century European history, in particular Imperial Germany and the origins of the First World War, in the history of the First World War and in its historiography.

She has published widely on German military planning in the years before the First World War, and has contributed to the recent historiographical debate on the nature of the Schlieffen Plan. She is currently working on a review article on recent publications on the First World War for Central European History, and a comparative history of the Battle of the Marne of 1914, to be published by Cambridge University Press. 

She recently published Die Julikrise. Europas Weg in den Ersten Weltkrieg (Beck Verlag, Munich 2014) and a document collection entitled The Origins of the First World War: diplomatic and military documents (Manchester University Press, Manchester 2013). Among her other publications is a study of the historiographical debates on the causes of the war of 1914, entitled The Origins of the First World War: Controversies and Consensus,(Longman, London 2002) for which she is planning a new and extended edition. Her DPhil thesis was published as Helmuth von Moltke and the Origins of the First World War (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2001).

Nicolas Offenstadt

Dr. Nicolas Offenstadt

Nicolas Offenstadt holds a PHD and a French agregation in history as well as a degree from Sciences Po Paris (Paris IEP). An Associate Professor with habilitation (HDR) in history at Paris I-Panthéon-Sorbonne University, he studies the practices of war and peace in the Late Middle Ages and the Contemporary period. His PHD focused on peace discourses and gestures during the Hundred Years War. (Faire la paix au Moyen Age, Odile Jacob, 2007) At Paris I University, he also teaches historiography and the history of the Great War.

A specialist of the First World War, he was the lead author of a collaborative research on the "Chemin des Dames", published by Stock: Le Chemin des Dames, de l’événement à la mémoire (2004, paperback 2012). After his early research work on pacifism in the inter-war years, he published Les Fusillés de la Grande Guerre et la mémoire collective (1914-1999), Editions Odile Jacob, 1999 (new edition 2009), La Grande Guerre en trente questions (2007). He is currently working on town criers and on the shaping and building of the memory of the First World War (14-18 aujourd’hui la Grande Guerre dans la France contemporaine, Odile Jacob, 2010). His recent publications include:  La Grande Guerre. Carnet du centenaire, Paris, Albin Michel (with André Loez)

Moderator:
Ian McKay

Ian McKay has taught history at Queen’s University since 1988; his recent publications in Reasoning Otherwise (2008), winner of the Sir John A. Macdonald prize of the Canadian Historical Associiation; In The Province of
History (2011), winner of the Pierre Savard Award of the International Canadian Studies Association; and, with Jamie Swift, Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in an Age of Anxiety (2012).